Tag Archives: Advice

Sheffield Gurdwara: The place to feel at home

Aiming to provide a place where people can feel at home, the only Sikh Temple in Sheffield was officially opened on the 28th of May 2012.

Located just 3 miles from the city centre, the Shri Guru Gobind Singh Ji Gurdwara has a large hall which can fit more than 300 people, a canteen, library and multiple prayer rooms.

The Gurdwara (meaning the House of God) is both a spiritual place of worship and a cultural learning centre for the young. Many university students come here regularly to perform prayers, worship and learn about religion.

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MASSOC: We’ll always be there for you

MASSOC (Malaysian and Singaporean Society of the University of Sheffield) has been around to ensure the welfare and well-being of Malaysian and Singaporean students in Sheffield.

“MASSOC’s aim is simply to make you feel comfortable through its support, resources and activities,” said Phoebe Yiin, the ex- vice president of MASSOC.

Phoebe Yiin, the ex-vice president of MASSOC.

As a Malaysian student, Phoebe understands the difficulties of Malaysian students when they come to study abroad. Thus, she committed herself to become part of MASSOC to help out new students to settle down in Sheffield.

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What’s next? Foreign students finding a job in the UK

Layla (left) and Monica are ecstatic at the opportunity to volunteer for the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics.

With a rise in unemployment rates, it is becoming increasingly difficult for international students to find jobs in the UK.

Furthermore, new post-study work visa regulations imposed by the British Border Agency restrict students from acquiring permanent employment.

However, it is not impossible for students to get paid or unpaid work experience while studying abroad, as illustrated by a few students from China.

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Make the first move: talking to locals

Universities often struggle with the lack of integration between international students and locals. Therefore, student unions, societies and members of community play an important role to assist students in this area.

Helen Francis, the president of Sheffield Hallam Union organises many activities  with her team for international students. The activities include day trips to Manchester and Liverpool and parties such as the Welcome Party, Disney Party and Cowboy Party.

The president of Sheffield Hallam Union, Helen Francis (left) really hopes to see the improvement of integration between the international with local students.

“Most international students are enthusiastic to participate in our events, and they also bring their unique cultures to the university which makes it livelier,” said Francis.

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Top career tips for international students

Proper career planning can determine the future employability for students who are graduating from college or university.

Tom Jackson, Career Adviser at Sheffield Hallam University(SHU) said student need to have self assessment to identify their career vision.

Tom Jackson, Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) career advisor, shares his top tips for a career action plan.

Developing a career path requires students to understand the environment in which they live and work, articulate their personal skills and then develop a future plan that is realistic for them.

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How to cope with homesickness

Homesickness can creep up especially on international students who arrive in a new place, meet new people and experience new things.

Students may find its exciting when they first arrive in a foreign country. But when the pressure of university starts to kick in, students start to think of friends and family back home.

Ian Maher: “Homesickness should not be dismissed, because it can be very hard on a student.”

Ian Maher, Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) chaplain and a member of the Student Wellbeing team, shares his top tips on how to cope with homesickness.

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Tips for improving your English

For international students who come from non-English speaking backgrounds, language may be a major obstacle for communication and learning.

According to Fran Potgieter, 41, an English lecturer from Sheffield Hallam University (SHU), the most difficult thing faced by most students is expressing complexity of meaning with accuracy and clarity.

“’Hedging’ and cautious language can be difficult to produce and perfect tenses are an issue for many students,” she added. (*Explanation of ‘hedge’ at the end of this story)

Fran Potgieter (right), has taught English for about 20 years.

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